String Quartet No. 3 (Beethoven)

The String Quartet No. 3 in D major, op. 18, No. 3, was written by Ludwig van Beethoven between 1798 and 1800 and published in 1801. Although it is numbered third, it was the first quartet Beethoven composed. It consists of four movements:Allegro Andante con moto Allegro PrestoAccording to Steinberg, this is “the gentlest, most consistently lyrical work [within Beethoven’s Op. 18]”,[1] except for the fourth movement, in which “Beethoven first explores the idea of shifting the center of gravity toward the end of a multimovement work.”[2] The first movement starts with a gentle and unassuming theme:Beethoven Quartet, Op. 18 No. 3, openingHowever, its return at the start of the recapitulation shows the theme in an entirely different light. Philip Radcliffe (1965, p. 24) describes this moment as “beautifully contrived.”[3] Burstein (1998, p.295), describes the dramatic and unusual harmonic progression at the end of the development section as “breathtaking.”[4]Beethoven Quartet Op. 18 No.3, first movement, bars 156-162“The sudden reinterpretation of the C# creates a type of tonal crisis which has deep structural ramifications for the entire movement. Beethoven’s brilliant manner of dealing with the implications of this unusual strategy indicates a debt to his teacher, Haydn, and also reveals much about Beethoven’s own craft and artistic vision.” [5]Notes[edit] ^ Steinberg, p. 159 ^ Steinberg, p. 163 ^ Radcliffe, P. (1965) Beethoven’s String Quartets. London, Hutchinson. ^ Burstein, L. P. (1998, p.295) “Surprising returns: the VII# in Beethoven’s String Quartet Op. 18 No.3, and its antecedents in Haydn.” Music Analysis, 17/3 pp295-312. ^ Burstein, L. P. (1998, p.295) “Surprising returns: the VII# in Beethoven’s String Quartet Op. 18 No.3, and its antecedents in Haydn.” Music Analysis, 17/3 pp295-312. References[edit]Robert Winter, Robert Martin eds. (1994). The Beethoven Quartet Companion. University of California Press. ISBN 0-520-08211-7. ; especially the essay by Michael Steinberg (pp. 159–163)External links[edit]String Quartet No. 3: Scores at the International Music Score Library Project Performance of String Quartet no. 3 by the Borromeo String Quartet from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in MP3 formatv t e String quartets by Ludwig van Beethoven Preludes and FuguesPrelude and Fugue for String Quartet in F major, Hess 30 Prelude and Fugue for String Q. thanks wikipedia.

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Pozdrav svijetu

This article does not cite any sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (August 2009) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)”Pozdrav svijetu” Eurovision Song Contest 1969 entry CountryYugoslaviaArtist(s)Ivica KrajačAsIvanWithM’sLanguageSerbo-CroatianComposer(s)Milan LentićLyricist(s)Milan LentićConductorMiljenko ProhaskaFinals performance Final result13thFinal points5Appearance chronology ◄ “Jedan dan” (1968)    “Pridi, dala ti bom cvet” (1970) ► “Pozdrav svijetu” (English translation: “Greetings to the world”) was the Yugoslavian entry in the Eurovision Song Contest 1969, performed in Serbo-Croatian by Ivan and the band M´s (consisted of Branko Marušić, Saša Sablić and Željko Ružić). The song is a ballad, in which Ivan and the band M’s salute all people of the world. wishing a “good day in several languages: Spanish, German, French, English, Dutch, Italian, Russian and Finnish. They end the song arguing: “Join their hands of friendship In a greeting to the world” and wishing newly :”A good day” The song was performed first on the night preceding Luxembourg’s Romuald with “Catherine” . At the close of voting, it had received 5 points, placing 13th in a field of 16. It was succeeded as Yugoslavian representative at the 1970 Contest by Eva Sršen with “Pridi, dala ti bom cvet”. v t e Eurovision Song Contest 1969   CountriesFinal (by final results) Spain (winner) United Kingdom (winner) Netherlands (winner) France (winner) Switzerland Monaco Ireland Belgium Sweden Germany Luxembourg Finland Yugoslavia Italy Portugal NorwayWithdrawn Liechtenstein   ArtistsFinal (by final results) Salomé Lulu Lenny Kuhr Frida Boccara Paola Del Medico Jean Jacques Muriel Day Louis Neefs Tommy Körberg Siw Malmkvist Romuald Jarkko & Laura Ivan & 4M Iva Zanicchi Simone de Oliveira Kirsti SparboeWithdrawn Vetty   SongsFinal (by final results) “Vivo cantando” “Boom Bang-a-Bang” “De troubadour” “Un jour, un enfant” “Bonjour, Bonjour” “Maman, Maman” “The Wages of Love” “Jennifer Jennings” “Judy, min vän” “Primaballerina” “Catherine” “Kuin silloin ennen” “Pozdrav svijetu” “Due grosse lacrime bianche” “Desfolhada portug. thanks wikipedia.

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Bunsoh

Bunsoh Coat of arms Bunsoh Location of Bunsoh within Dithmarschen district Coordinates: 54°10′N 09°20′E / 54.167°N 9.333°E / 54.167; 9.333Coordinates: 54°10′N 09°20′E / 54.167°N 9.333°E / 54.167; 9.333 Country Germany State Schleswig-Holstein District Dithmarschen Municipal assoc. Mitteldithmarschen Government  • Mayor Ingrid Del Bufalo Area  • Total 11.7 km2 (4.5 sq mi) Population (2015-12-31)[1]  • Total 782  • Density 67/km2 (170/sq mi) Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Postal codes 25767 Dialling codes 04835 Vehicle registration HEI Website Amt Albersdorf Bunsoh is a municipality in the district of Dithmarschen, in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. See also[edit]Albersdorf (Amt Kirchspielslandgemeinde)v t e Towns and municipalities of DithmarschenAlbersdorf Arkebek Averlak Bargenstedt Barkenholm Barlt Bergewöhrden Brickeln Brunsbüttel Buchholz Bunsoh Burg Busenwurth Büsum Büsumer Deichhausen Dellstedt Delve Diekhusen-Fahrstedt Dingen Dörpling Eddelak Eggstedt Elpersbüttel Epenwöhrden Fedderingen Frestedt Friedrichsgabekoog Friedrichskoog Gaushorn Glüsing Großenrade Groven Gudendorf Hedwigenkoog Heide Hellschen-Heringsand-Unterschaar Helse Hemme Hemmingstedt Hennstedt Hillgroven Hochdonn Hollingstedt Hövede Immenstedt Kaiser-Wilhelm-Koog Karolinenkoog Kleve Krempel Kronprinzenkoog Krumstedt Kuden Lehe Lieth Linden Lohe-Rickelshof Lunden Marnerdeich Marne Meldorf Neuenkirchen Neufeld Neufelderkoog Nindorf Norddeich Norderheistedt Nordermeldorf Norderwöhrden Nordhastedt Odderade Oesterdeichstrich Oesterwurth Offenbüttel Osterrade Ostrohe Pahlen Quickborn Ramhusen Rehm-Flehde-Bargen Reinsbüttel Sankt Annen Sankt Michaelisdonn Sarzbüttel Schafstedt Schalkholz Schlichting Schmedeswurth Schrum Schülp Stelle-Wittenwurth Strübbel Süderdeich Süderdorf Süderhastedt Süderheistedt Tellingstedt Tensbüttel-Röst Tielenhemme Trennewurth Volsemenhusen Wallen Warwerort Weddingstedt Welmbüttel Wennbüttel Wesselburen Wesselburener Deichhausen Wesselburenerkoog Wesseln Westerborstel Westerdeichstrich Wiemerstedt Windbergen Wöhrden Wolmersdorf WrohmReferences[edit] ^ “Statistikamt Nord – Bevölkerung der Gemeinden in Schleswig-Holstein 4. Quartal 2015] (XLS-file)”. Statistisches Amt für Hamburg und Schleswig-Holstein (in German).  This. thanks wikipedia.

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Shanghai Street

Shanghai StreetThe Yau Ma Tei Tin Hau Temple at Yung Shue Tau.Chinese 上海街Transcriptions Standard Mandarin Hanyu Pinyin Shànghǎi Jiē Yue: Cantonese Yale Romanization seung6 hoi2 gaai1Shanghai Street (Chinese: 上海街) is a 2.3 km long street in the Jordan, Yau Ma Tei and Mong Kok areas of Kowloon, Hong Kong, China. Completed in 1887 under the name of Station Street (差館街),[1] it was once the most prosperous street in Kowloon. It originates from the south at Austin Road, and terminates in the north at Lai Chi Kok Road. Parallel to Shanghai Street are Nathan Road, Temple Street, Portland Street, Reclamation Street and Canton Road. Though parallel, Shanghai Street was marked by 2- to 3-floor Chinese-style buildings while Nathan Road was marked by Western-style buildings.Contents 1 History 2 Features 3 Heritage3.1 Engineer’s Office of the Former Pumping Station 3.2 Shophouses (Tong Lau)3.2.1 History of shophouses 3.2.2 Preservation 4 Building and street rehabilitation 5 Langham Place project 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Shanghai Street in the early 1900s. Shanghai Street in the 1960s. Hanging signs advertise the presence of sex industry venues mixed in with other shops and residential buildings. Prior to 1874 the land that Shanghai Street stands on was sea, making Shanghai Street an early example of reclaimed land in Hong Kong. The street is not so named because of a Shanghainese population. Prior to being renamed Shanghai Street it was originally called Station Street (差館街). The reason being the presence of Yau Ma Tei Police Station, a police station located at the junction of Public Square Street and Shanghai Street, until its relocation to No. 627 Canton Road in 1922. Since the police station was the landmark of the area, the street was named for it. On 12 November 1898, it was divided into two sections, Station Street South and Station Street North. There are two reasons for the streets renaming. First, in 1909, the Government started to name streets in Kowloon after major Chinese provinces that traded with Hong Kong, to recognise Hong Kong as a commercial port. The British colonial government in Hong Kong found the area of Station Street was as prosperous as Shanghai in China at that time while Hong Kong was having trade relation with Shanghai. Therefore, they renamed Station street to Shanghai Street on 19 March 1909.[2] The second reason. thanks wikipedia.

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The Underachievers

For the film of the same name, see The Underachievers (film). The UnderachieversIssa Gold and AK performing in August 2013Background information Origin Brooklyn, New York, U.S. Genres Hip hop Years active 2011–present LabelsRPM MSC BrainfeederAssociated actsASAP Mob Denzel Curry Dyme-A-Duzin Flatbush Zombies Flying Lotus Pro EraWebsite www.theualifestyle.comMembers AK Issa Gold The Underachievers are an American hip hop duo from Flatbush, Brooklyn, New York. Formed in 2011, the duo is composed of rappers AK and Issa Gold. American record producer Flying Lotus signed the duo to his Brainfeeder record label in 2012; however, they’ve failed to deliver any releases to the label. Following that signing they independently released two mixtapes, Indigoism and Lords of Flatbush in 2013. Their debut studio album Cellar Door: Terminus Ut Exordium was released on August 12, 2014. The Underachievers released their second official album Evermore: The Art of Duality on September 25, 2015.Contents 1 History1.1 2007–2010: Early beginnings 1.2 2011–2012: Career beginnings, signing to Brainfeeder 1.3 2013: Indigoism and Lords of Flatbush 1.4 2013–present: Cellar Door: Terminus Ut Exordium and Evermore: The Art of Duality 2 Musical style and influence 3 Personal life 4 Discography4.1 Studio albums 4.2 EPs 4.3 Mixtapes 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] 2007–2010: Early beginnings[edit] Issa Gold and AK grew up just a few blocks from each other in Flatbush, Brooklyn. The duo first met in 2007, after AK’s friend Jacob brought Gold to his house one day to smoke marijuana, where they clicked instantly and discussed psychedelic drugs, which they would later do together along with Juice and Meech of Flatbush Zombies.[1][2] 2011–2012: Career beginnings, signing to Brainfeeder[edit] AK began rapping at the age of eleven, later on in high school he would work under the stage name The Underachiever.[3] Issa Gold started rapping much later, not taking it seriously until around late 2011. The duo then began making music together under the name “The Underachievers” after a producer pushed them to work together, which resulted in them forming the group.[4] Gold explained the name saying, “I feel like the things that we do could be considered underachieving, like we smoke pot. People would probably meet us at first and be like, They’re probably just potheads. And then they’ll talk to me, or talk to AK,. thanks wikipedia.

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Nikolay Bankov

Nikolay BankovPersonal information Full name Nikolay Ivelinov Bankov Date of birth (1990-11-19) 19 November 1990 (age 25) Place of birth Dobrich, Bulgaria Height 1.89 m (6 ft 2 in) Playing position Goalkeeper Club informationCurrent teamLokomotiv GO Number 91 Youth careerDobrudzha Dobrich Senior career* Years Team Apps (Gls) 2008–2010 Spartak Varna 14 (0) 2010–2013 Minyor Pernik 8 (0) 2013 Spartak Varna 11 (0) 2014–2015 Haskovo 25 (0) 2015 Pirin Blagoevgrad 0 (0) 2016 Dobrudzha Dobrich 12 (0) 2016– Lokomotiv GO 0 (0)* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 1 June 2016.Nikolay Ivelinov Bankov (Bulgarian: Николай Банков; born 19 November 1990) is a Bulgarian footballer, currently playing as a goalkeeper for Lokomotiv Gorna Oryahovitsa. Bankov started his career in his home town Dobrich in the local team Dobrudzha Dobrich. External links[edit]Nikolay Bankov profile at Soccerwayv t e FC Lokomotiv Gorna Oryahovitsa – current squad1 Kunchev 4 Hristov 5 Kavdanski 6 Fidanin 7 Mechev 8 Zhelev 9 Kanev 10 Smirnov 11 Trifonov 12 Saykov 14 Kifouéti 18 Genkov 19 Coureur 23 Uzunov 26 M. Ivanov 29 Dichev 30 Atanasov 33 Tsonkov 37 Kerchev 66 Balakov 77 Genchev 88 Apostolov 91 Bankov Djoman Manager: ChervenkovThis biographical article related to association football in Bulgaria, about a goalkeeper, is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it. v t e. thanks wikipedia.

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Samuel March Phillipps

Samuel March Phillipps (1780–1862) was an English civil servant and legal writer.Contents 1 Life 2 Works 3 Family 4 NotesLife[edit] The second son of Thomas March of More Crichel in Dorset, he was born at Uttoxeter on 14 July 1780. His father assumed the additional surname of Phillipps on succeeding in 1796 to the estate of Garendon Park in Leicestershire, under the will of his cousin Samuel Phillipps. His mother was Susan, fourteenth daughter of Charles Lisle of Crux-Easton, Hampshire; Charles March-Phillipps was his elder brother.[1] He was educated at Charterhouse School and Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, where he graduated B.A. in 1802, and proceeded M.A. in 1805.[2] He was called to the bar at the Inner Temple in 1806, but did not practise.[3] In 1827 Phillipps accepted the post of permanent under-secretary for home affairs, which he held until 1848, when he retired, and was sworn of the privy council. He died at Great Malvern on 11 March 1862.[3] Works[edit] Phillipps wrote Treatise on the Law of Evidence, London, 1814, which became a standard textbook. The eighth and last English edition, in the preparation of which he was assisted by Andrew Amos, appeared at London in 1838, 2 vols. The fifth American edition was published at New York in 1868, 3 vols. In 1826 he edited State Trials; or a Collection of the most interesting Trials prior to the Revolution of 1688, London, 2 vols.[3] Family[edit] Phillipps married, on 16 October 1812, Charemelle (d. 1825), second daughter of Charles Grant, and sister of Charles Grant, 1st Baron Glenelg, by whom he had two sons.[3] Notes[edit] ^ “March Phillipps, Charles (1779-1862), of Garendon Park, Leics.”. History of Parliament online. Retrieved 17 September 2013.  ^ “Phillipps (formerly March), Samuel (PHLS797S)”. A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge.  ^ a b c d  Lee, Sidney, ed. (1896). “Phillipps, Samuel March”. Dictionary of National Biography. 45. London: Smith, Elder & Co. Attribution This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Lee, Sidney, ed. (1896). “Phillipps, Samuel March”. Dictionary of National Biography. 45. London: Smith, Elder & Co. Authority controlWorldCat Identities VIAF: 22871457 GND: 115438580. thanks wikipedia.

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Ozyptila nigristerna

Ozyptila nigristerna Scientific classification Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: Arachnida Order: Araneae Family: Thomisidae Genus: Ozyptila Species: O. nigristerna Binomial name Ozyptila nigristerna Dalmas, 1922Ozyptila nigristerna is a crab spider species found in Italy.[1] See also[edit]List of Thomisidae speciesReferences[edit] ^ “Ozyptila nigristerna Dalmas, 1922”. University of Berne. Retrieved 2014-03-06.  External links[edit] Ozyptila nigristerna at the Encyclopedia of Life This spider-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it. v t e. thanks wikipedia.

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Nontsikelelo Veleko

Nontsikelelo ‘Lolo’ Veleko (born 19 August 1977 in Bodibe, North West Province) is a South African photographer most notably recognised for her depiction of black identity, urbanisation and fashion in post-apartheid South Africa.[1]Contents 1 Life and work 2 Reviews 3 Currently 4 Exhibitions4.1 Solo Exhibitions 4.2 Group Exhibitions 4.3 Awards & Nominations 4.4 Collections 4.5 Books 4.6 Selected Articles and Reviews 4.7 Catalogues 5 References 6 BibliographyLife and work[edit] Nontsikelelo Veleko grew up in Cape Town and attended Luhlaza High School in Khayelitsha. In 1995 she studied graphic design at the Cape Technikon. After moving to Johannesburg, Veleko studied photography at the Market Theatre Photo Workshop(1999–2004), an organisation co-founded by David Goldblatt which aims to provide formal training to young photographers who would have otherwise not have access to such resources.[1] In 2003, Veleko documented graffiti throughout Cape Town and Johannesburg, a series she titles ‘The ones on top won’t make it Stop!’ in her first solo exhibition at the Johannesburg Art Gallery. These photographs encapsulated the social and political atmosphere of post-apartheid South Africa.[2] This same year, Veleko was nominated for the MTN New Contemporaries Arts Awards. This well-recognized competition identifies four rising South African artist and selects a winner amongst them.Throughout the next couple of years, Veleko’s work was showcased in various exhibitions throughout South Africa, Europe and Australia.[3] In 2006, her photographs were part of the group exhibition, ‘Snap Judgments: New Positions in Contemporary African Photography, at the International Center of Photography (ICP) in New York. There, the bold and lively portraits depicting South Africa street style from her series Beauty is in the Eye of the Beholder attracted a great deal of attention, shifting previous perceptions of Africa as a whole on an international scale. Veleko explains that she looks at fashion “and how it creates identity, because fashion plays with identity”. In regards to the title of the series, she states: “I thought the way I see beauty and the way I perceive beauty might be different to someone else next to me..So the project is called Beauty is in the Eye of the Beholder, because for me they are beautiful.” [2] Alongside this, Veleko has also implemented clothing ‘to deliberately challenge assumptions of identity based on appearances and h. thanks wikipedia.

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Rupee (musician)

This biography of a living person needs additional citations for verification. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living persons that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately, especially if potentially libelous or harmful. (September 2010) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) RUPEEI Love Soca 2014 – Mangos, South BeachBackground information Birth name Rupert Clarke Also known as Rupee Born (1975-09-10) September 10, 1975 (age 41) Origin Germany Genres Soca Occupation(s) Musician, producer, song-writer, artist Instruments Vocals Years active 1997–2000 (group) 2000–present (solo) Labels Independent Associated acts Coalishun, Rihanna, Shaggy, Lil’ Kim, Daddy Yankee, Wisin & Yandel, Red Rat, Fay-Ann Lyons, Destra Garcia, Alison Hinds, Thara Rupert Clarke (born September 10, 1975), best known by his stage name Rupee, is a soca musician from Barbados.[1][2] He was born in military barracks in Germany to a German mother and a Bajan father, who was serving in the British armed forces at the time. He later migrated to Barbados. He was signed to Atlantic Records.Contents 1 Early life 2 Career2.1 1997–2000: Coalishun 2.2 2000–present: Solo 3 Discography3.1 Albums 3.2 Singles 3.3 Collaborations 4 Achievements 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] By the age of nine, Rupee had lived three different cultures – German, English, and Barbadian. Spending his first years in England, he was exposed to a contrast of sounds which reflected his parents’ diverse backgrounds: calypso on the side of his West Indian father, pop and rock and roll from his mother. He and his siblings would often perform on stage, coming up with all sorts of chants, rhymes and antics to tease the audience. Rupee eventually moved to Barbados in 1985. He had his first major break after winning the Richard Stoute Teen Talent Competition in 1993, when he was a schoolboy at Harrison College. Career[edit] 1997–2000: Coalishun[edit] Rupee emerged on the local soca scene after being invited to join the then popular Bajan band, Coalishun, along with singers like Terencia Coward-“TC” and Adrian Clarke in 1997. Though initially more dancehall oriented, Rupee would find himself settling into the soca genre, a genre indigenous to Barbados. This was marked by the release of his first hit single “Ice Cream”. 2000–present: Solo[edit] “Ice Cream” was followed by a strin. thanks wikipedia.

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